Archive | January 2017

Extractive Seeing: On the visual culture of oil with Professor Janet Stewart

technical museum vienna.jpgTuesday 7 March 2017, 6:00pm in 405 Business School, Durham University

This paper is part of a larger research project, Curating Europe’s Oil, which sets out to investigate the role that archives (of different kinds) and museums have in constructing and potentially deconstructing existing narratives about fossil fuels that make possible particular behaviours and responses, while closing down or erasing others. It considers the role that oil plays in twenty-first century cultural memory in Europe, investigating how Europe’s oil history is being archived, narrated and displayed in key cultural institutions, showing how an understanding of the processes through which the experience of ‘living with oil’ in Europe has been catalogued, controlled and challenged are invaluable in imagining new narratives of possible energy futures. This paper explores one aspect of the larger project, arguing that a particular way of seeing, linked to the 20th century’s dependence on fossil fuels, in general, and oil, in particular, comes to dominate in the construction of the visual record of Europe’s oil dependencies, and in the way in which that visual record is interpreted. The paper introduces the concept of ‘extractive seeing’, and employs it to frame an investigation of the visual culture of oil in Austria, a country not often immediately associated with Europe’s oil history.

Professor Janet Stewart is the Head of School in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures at Durham University.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

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Special Japanese exhibition successfully held at the Oriental Museum with CVAC funding.

the-shogun-warrierA CVAC-sponsored exhibition, The Shogun’s Cultured Warriors, was held at the Oriental Museum, from 7th June 2016 to 27th November 2016.  The samurai were the military class of Japan who developed from provincial warriors into the ruling elite. They were a powerful force in Japan for more than six centuries and so had a profound effect on military and political life. High ranking warriors were also expected to develop their literary skills and they played an active role as patrons of the arts. The exhibition explored the role of the samurai class as patrons and producers of the arts. It also examined the legacy of samurai culture which remains a potent source of inspiration in Japan – and the west – today.

The exhibition was seen by 12,769 visitors to the museum galleries.

The exhibition was created to support the conference: ‘400th Anniversary of the Death of the first Tokugawa Shogun: The Life and Legacy of Tokugawa Ieyasu’ (7th-8th June, 2016), which was being hosted by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures.  The creation of the Tokugawa shogunate (1603-1868) was one of the key turning points in Japanese history, and 2016 marked 400 years since the death of its founder, the first shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu. To mark this important anniversary, the conference brought together experts on Japanese history, religion, and material culture to commemorate, explain, and explore Ieyasu’s career and legacy.

Rebekah Clements, January 2017

 

Behind the Scenes at the Museum: Masterclass with Jo Quinton-Tulloch

1st February 2017, 09:30 to 11:00, Pennington Room, Grey College

CVAC are delighted to welcome Jo Quinton-Tulloch to Durham to give our Annual Behind the Scenes at the Museum Masterclass. She is the Director of the National Media Museum in Bradford.

The National Media Museum is a relatively young museum – just over 30 years old. Its origin stems from the Science Museum, London, but it has grown over time by incorporating a number of other collections, originally developed by other bodies and individuals, at different times and for different purposes. This has resulted in a collection of some of the best, most significant and historically important visual material to be found anywhere in the world, spanning a range of cultural, scientific and aesthetic disciplines.

The masterclass will begin to consider musuems and the value of collaborations.

To book a place, please email cvac@durham.ac.uk

Behind the Scenes at the Museum with Jo Quinton-Tulloch. 31st January 2017 at 18:00, Kenworthy Hall, St. Mary’s College. Durham

jqt

The National Media Museum is a relatively young museum – just over 30 years old. Its origin stems from the Science Museum, London, but it has grown over time by incorporating a number of other collections, originally developed by other bodies and individuals, at different times and for different purposes. This has resulted in a collection of some of the best, most significant and historically important visual material to be found anywhere in the world, spanning a range of cultural, scientific and aesthetic disciplines.

The talk will (briefly!) explore the museum’s core collections of Photography, Film and Television, then touch on some of the challenges faced by the Museum sector, using the recent experiences of the National Media Museum as a case study.

Jo Quinton-Tulloch is the Director of the National Media Museum in Bradford.

No need to book – all welcome.