Roman Catholic Art in Chile and England

Francesco Grandi (1831-1891), Saint Francis Borgia Prays in Front of the Most Blessed Sacrament, Rome 1870, oil on canvas, detail, Santiago (Chile), Saint Ignatius of Loyola Roman Catholic Church (Photo: Giulio Archinà — © Studio PrimoPiano [http://www.studioprimopiano.net/])

Francesco Grandi (1831-1891), Saint Francis Borgia Prays in Front of the Most Blessed Sacrament, Rome 1870, oil on canvas, detail, Santiago (Chile), Saint Ignatius of Loyola Roman Catholic Church (Photo: Giulio Archinà — © Studio PrimoPiano [http://www.studioprimopiano.net/])

CVAC has received a generous support from Santander Universities to conduct series of research trips and meetings in Chile in relation to the ongoing project ‘Rome in the World: Pius IX and the Foundation of Global Catholic Heritage’, led by Dr Stefano Cracolici and Dr Giovanna Capitelli. The purpose of these visits is to compare the dissemination of 19th-century Roman Catholic repertoire in Chile and England. In Chile, the turn to Rome to decorate Catholic churches and institutions chimed with the political strategy to disenfranchise a recently independent country from its colonial bonds; in England, it served to refuel with sacred energy the restoration of the English Catholic landscape after its devastation during the early modern period. In both cases, we argue, Rome contributed to create zones of civilisational prestige for an imagined community shared globally. The possibility to conduct a comparative study supported by community-led initiatives in Chile and England would allow us to frame the investigation of a cultural heritage of local significance within a global context, and to explore new avenues for broadening our collaboration, achieving international recognition and exploring innovative forms of impact activities.

In collaboration with our Chilean co-investigator, Prof Fernando Guzmán Schiappacasse (Director of CEP), we intend to develop a collaborative partnership between the Centre for Visual Arts and Cultures at Durham University and the Centro de Estudios del Patrimonio (CEP) at the Universidad Adolpho Ibañez in Santiago and Valparaiso, with the additional involvement of the Durham Centre for Catholic Studies and Centre for the Ethics of Cultural Heritage. During our visit to Santiago, we will conduct a series of meetings with non-academic partners working in the heritage and conservation sectors, such as the Fundación Altiplano, the Centro de Conservación, Restauración y Estudios Artísticos (CREA) and Centro Nacional de Conservación y Restauración (CNCR). Further contacts will be established with crucial cultural institutions, such as the Centro de Estudiantes del Colegio San Ignacio de Alonso de Ovalle, the Centro Patrimonial Recoleta Dominica CPRD) and the Dirección de Bibliotecas, Archivos y Museos (DIBAM) in Santiago.

Stefano Cracolici,

Durham University

Advertisements

Tags:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: